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Riders who depend on the 7 train are in for more headaches over the next few months. Starting late Friday night, the MTA will suspend service between Times Square and Queensboro Plaza for 13 weekends through July. MORE

Riders who depend on the 7 train are in for more headaches over the next few months. Starting late Friday night, the MTA will suspend service between Times Square and Queensboro Plaza for 13 weekends through July. MORE

Hey, MTA — what do you say? Robert Bacon has some Super ideas for the next subway map. 
-SR, S360

Hey, MTA — what do you say? Robert Bacon has some Super ideas for the next subway map. 

-SR, S360

Free Ride: New York’s MTA to Waive Fares for Some Subway Lines on Sandy AnniversaryAccording to an email sent from Governor Andrew Cuomo: “From 12:01 Tuesday morning until 11:59 Tuesday evening, riders entering stations on the A line between Howard Beach and the Rockaway Peninsula and riders entering stations on the R line between Bay Ridge-95th Street and Court Street will not be charged a fare.”

Free Ride: New York’s MTA to Waive Fares for Some Subway Lines on Sandy Anniversary
According to an email sent from Governor Andrew Cuomo: “From 12:01 Tuesday morning until 11:59 Tuesday evening, riders entering stations on the A line between Howard Beach and the Rockaway Peninsula and riders entering stations on the R line between Bay Ridge-95th Street and Court Street will not be charged a fare.”

micropolisnyc:

theparisreview:

Checking out books on the subway? We can dig it! (And those bookshelf mock-ups would make a pleasant change from Dr. Zizmor ads, not that we don’t love him, too.)

Brilliant idea, meant for anyone who’s been on a long subway ride with nothing to read. But as it turns out, this is just a concept, and the New York Public Library has nothing to do with it, despite their logo being front and center.

The credit goes to students at the Miami Ad School. But the title of their project, “A Simple Solution to help New York’s Empty Libraries,” is flawed, because the libraries in this city aren’t empty at all.

Since 2008, NYPL circulation is up 44 percent, to 28 million. Attendance is up 12 percent, to 18 million. And computer usage is up 160 percent.

That said, Miami’s students are on to something here. NYPL, take note!

micropolisnyc:

Brooklyn wins, yet again.
Six out of every 10 people who buy Edwin Class’s I❤NY subway maps buy the one that says “Brooklyn” inside the big red heart. About three of every 10, he figured, buy the general, non-borough-specific map. And the rest is divvied up between Queens and the Bronx. Once in a very long, long while, someone asks him for a Staten Island edition.
—Union Square station

micropolisnyc:

Brooklyn wins, yet again.

Six out of every 10 people who buy Edwin Class’s I❤NY subway maps buy the one that says “Brooklyn” inside the big red heart. About three of every 10, he figured, buy the general, non-borough-specific map. And the rest is divvied up between Queens and the Bronx. Once in a very long, long while, someone asks him for a Staten Island edition.

—Union Square station

NYC subway train operator Ed Goetzl, an 11-year vet, has been at the controls for a pair of 12-9s, transit shorthand for someone hit by a train. MORE

NYC subway train operator Ed Goetzl, an 11-year vet, has been at the controls for a pair of 12-9s, transit shorthand for someone hit by a train. MORE

Believe it or not, the MTA does keep track of the leftover pennies from the weird bonuses on thrown out metro cards. But they still have to carry it against their budget, on the off chance that they all get turned in at the same time.
Transportation Nation reporter Jim O’Grady on the Brian Lehrer Show
micropolisnyc:

As if the death of a subway commuter, pushed onto the tracks, weren’t enough, we have the following to digest:According to DNA: “More than a minute — and possibly as long as 90 seconds — elapsed before the train slammed into him, a police source said. It was not immediately clear whether anyone on the platform tried to help Han to safety. ‘People were just standing in shock,’ said witness Patrick Gomez.” [DNA]Well, not everyone. Certainly not the photographer R. Umar Abbasi, whose image graces the New York Post’s controversial cover.According to the Post article, Abbasi claims he was “running” toward the victim, 58-year-old Ki-Suck Han, while simultaneously “firing off” his flash in order to alert the train. This narrative doesn’t really hold up, however, when you simply examine the photo.Does that image look as if it were taken in mid-sprint? To me it looks like a perfectly level, well-composed picture, taken by someone whose feet were planted pretty firm — a freelance photojournalist, as it turns out.

micropolisnyc:

As if the death of a subway commuter, pushed onto the tracks, weren’t enough, we have the following to digest:

According to DNA: “More than a minute — and possibly as long as 90 seconds — elapsed before the train slammed into him, a police source said. It was not immediately clear whether anyone on the platform tried to help Han to safety. ‘People were just standing in shock,’ said witness Patrick Gomez.” [DNA]

Well, not everyone. Certainly not the photographer R. Umar Abbasi, whose image graces the New York Post’s controversial cover.

According to the Post article, Abbasi claims he was “running” toward the victim, 58-year-old Ki-Suck Han, while simultaneously “firing off” his flash in order to alert the train. This narrative doesn’t really hold up, however, when you simply examine the photo.

Does that image look as if it were taken in mid-sprint? To me it looks like a perfectly level, well-composed picture, taken by someone whose feet were planted pretty firm — a freelance photojournalist, as it turns out.

What if every bus, train and ferry in NYC were turned into a pretty light and seen from space?

The subway comes back, in GIF. 
datanews:

Since Sandy left town, we’ve been downloading MTA subway-recovery maps to feed WNYC’s Changing Trains map. Our Steve Melendez put them together in a time-lapse GIF. Click through to the full-size image.

The subway comes back, in GIF. 

datanews:

Since Sandy left town, we’ve been downloading MTA subway-recovery maps to feed WNYC’s Changing Trains map. Our Steve Melendez put them together in a time-lapse GIF. Click through to the full-size image.

architizer:

Catalogue of Architecture Underground - drawing of every subway station in New York City
This GIF compares active stations, spaces used by the MTA and spaces that have been abandoned - an amazing variety of underground architecture.

architizer:

Catalogue of Architecture Underground - drawing of every subway station in New York City

This GIF compares active stations, spaces used by the MTA and spaces that have been abandoned - an amazing variety of underground architecture.

Pro-Tolerance Ads Begin Appearing In NYC Subway

theatlanticvideo:

An Animated Look at the Elegant Geometrics of the Subway

Keita Onishi’s music video is so spellbinding that it evokes a computer screen saver, making the viewer want to gaze mindlessly at the screen until it begins again. The video features “Dynamics of the Subway,” from the experimental Japanese band Haisuinonasa’s first album, Animal Bodies. Each geometric shape matches a musical note, in sync with the score. In the end, the shapes reveal not only a moving train, but the components of the subway system.

coooooooooooooooolio —A.P.

micropolisnyc:

Ever wonder why THIS guy was the public face of a big law firm? I sure do. Didn’t realize he was the former anchor at Channel 5, as noted by BK Mag in their “Ten Greatest and Strangest Subway Ads of All time” roundup.
My bigger question is this: Why do all the ads identify him as “John Roland, Compensated Spokesman”?
Is this to distinguish him from all those volunteer spokespeople in the industry? Do injured workers feel oddly reassured by the knowledge that John’s paid to stand there and look at us in that somewhat eerie, closemouthed way?
I’m a reporter and am paid to find these things out, but I’ll just let the mystery stand.

micropolisnyc:

Ever wonder why THIS guy was the public face of a big law firm? I sure do. Didn’t realize he was the former anchor at Channel 5, as noted by BK Mag in their “Ten Greatest and Strangest Subway Ads of All time” roundup.

My bigger question is this: Why do all the ads identify him as “John Roland, Compensated Spokesman”?

Is this to distinguish him from all those volunteer spokespeople in the industry? Do injured workers feel oddly reassured by the knowledge that John’s paid to stand there and look at us in that somewhat eerie, closemouthed way?

I’m a reporter and am paid to find these things out, but I’ll just let the mystery stand.

micropolisnyc:

Boombox Belt Buckle, as worn by Phillee Phyll, singer and old-school aficionado.

Phyll is currently performing his motivational song “I Wrote a Love Letter to Myself” to crowds across the city.